Aigas Field Centre
Aigas Field Centre

A busy night at the Quarry Hide

28 November, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

Having been at Aigas for almost a month and not seeing a badger, I decided to head to the Quarry Hide on a night off and wait for as long as it took in the hopes of seeing one of Britain’s largest land carnivores. At 7pm, after baiting the logs at the hide with peanuts and peanut butter, we headed inside to wait. Not long after we had arrived, the trees to the left of the hide rustled and we saw a shape moving around. It was a barn owl which flew around for a bit before perching on a tree trunk directly in front of us. It stayed there for a few minutes, giving us a good show before flying off into the darkness. Only a
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A Morning to Remember at the Aigas Loch

28 September, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

Determined to see an osprey fishing on the Aigas loch I made my way to the Kingdom hide at the ungodly hour of 4.30am. The hide is situated on the banks of the loch and offers excellent views over the water whilst also providing shelter and welcome relief from the midges. Having had fantastic views of a beaver feeding the previous night I was hoping that my luck would continue. I can tell you now that it most certainly did. Whilst waiting for an osprey to appear I occupied myself by scanning the furthest bank in roughly the same area the beaver had been the night before. Sure enough I managed to spot it again looking like a small furry island breaking the surface of the water.
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Pine Martens at the Aigas Wildlife Hide

11 August, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

Our night in the hide, there at the Aigas Field Centre in the Scottish Highlands, remains a high point in our recent Road Scholar tour. We gathered at about 8:00 p.m., five Road Scholars led by Charlie (Charlotte Gardener), one of the young women Rangers who led us quietly into the hide. It was a comfortable space. Three high, long benches faced the open viewing windows. The benches were padded and a shelf in front of windows allowed for resting elbows, forearms and, even, chins. We knew it would probably be a long wait and we got settled as quietly as possible. I crossed my forearms comfortably on the shelf and watched Charlie as she seeded the viewing areas. We knew that pine martens, a relative of mink, otters and badgers, had a den
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