Aigas Field Centre
Aigas Field Centre

Monkey Business

18 December, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

I am sat writing this blog post after watching the sun set over Lake Victoria. I am fortunate enough to be spending three weeks volunteering for The Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Wildlife Conservation Trust (The Chimpanzee Trust), an NGO based in Uganda which focuses on rescuing orphaned chimpanzees and working to tackle the problems that lead to these individuals becoming orphans in the first place. This involves working directly with communities who inhabit areas where wild, unprotected populations of chimpanzees are known to reside. Aigas Field Centre runs a staff exchange programme with the sanctuary so that we can share knowledge, skills and experience with fellow conservationists from completely different backgrounds.  Earlier this year we had the sanctuary manager and vet, Dr Titus, over to stay with us
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Foxes at Dawn

4 December, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

A frozen loch gleams icily in the last hour of night.  An eerie stillness settles around us.  No birds are stirring yet; deer are still out on the river fields, yet to slip back into the woods as winter daylight slowly spills in from the cloudless east.  Whisps of ghostly white mist hang over the valley and somewhere far upstream we can hear the bugling of the twelve whooper swans that have winged in from the high Arctic to winter on our river. We had dumped a road-kill roe deer carcass out on the moor with a stealthcam in place to see who and what would exploit it.  The first and obvious images were fox.  A solitary fox tugging at the rib cage and hauling it off
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Saving Scotland’s Highland Tiger

16 November, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

Last week Scottish Wildcat Action (SWA) convened at Culloden Battlefield for a forum which we had the privilege to attend. As Aigas Field Centre plays a role in the conservation breeding programme it was a great opportunity for us to learn how SWA were getting on elsewhere. SWA is an action plan supported by the Scottish Government and Heritage Lottery Fund - united by a group of experts with the ultimate goal of saving the UK’s only remaining native feline, the Scottish Wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris), from extinction. The ‘Highland Tiger’ appears like a tabby cat but more muscular and has slightly different pelage. The wildcat can be differentiated by having a dorsal stripe that does not extend into the tail, a broad, flat head, and dark
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Polly the pine marten is thriving at Aigas

9 November, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

We were contacted by Hessilhead back in August who had received a pine marten kit and wanted to know if we might be able to release it at Aigas. After weeks of rehabilitative care at Hessilhead Wildlife Rescue Centre, Gay and Andy Christie brought her to Aigas where she was temporarily housed in an enclosure designed and built by our Staff Naturalist, Ben Jones, in a patch of woodland in the Aigas gardens. Ben set up Bushell stealth cams around the pen and we watched of the following nights as our local pine martens came up to the enclosure to see Polly. With no evidence of aggression or worrying behaviour from Polly or the other pine martens we release her onto the Aigas estate. Since then, we
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Walking and Wildlife, July 2017

18 October, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

Ronald and Ute, from The Netherlands, kindly sent us this wonderful album with images from their stay here in July on one of our Walking and Wildlife programmes. Scroll through the album below to see what they got up to!

Red Squirrel Sightings at Aigas

10 October, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

Here at Aigas, we’re having great luck with our new red squirrel hide. The hide is very cosy with a turf roof. It has been up for a month now and since then we’ve been topping it up with peanuts and hazelnuts. The squirrels are very partial to the hazelnuts - they are now caching them for winter. The hazelnuts also provide the squirrels with almost all of the nutrients they require (peanuts alone don’t provide much calcium or vitamins). I was lucky enough to have a great squirrel encounter last week. As I was passing the hide I was caught in a sudden downpour so decided to take shelter inside. After around twenty minutes there was a scratching sound on the back wall, which travelled upwards
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A Morning to Remember at the Aigas Loch

28 September, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

Determined to see an osprey fishing on the Aigas loch I made my way to the Kingdom hide at the ungodly hour of 4.30am. The hide is situated on the banks of the loch and offers excellent views over the water whilst also providing shelter and welcome relief from the midges. Having had fantastic views of a beaver feeding the previous night I was hoping that my luck would continue. I can tell you now that it most certainly did. Whilst waiting for an osprey to appear I occupied myself by scanning the furthest bank in roughly the same area the beaver had been the night before. Sure enough I managed to spot it again looking like a small furry island breaking the surface of the water.
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A Day on the West Coast

14 September, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

A day on the west coast of Scotland is the highlight for many of our guests during their week here at Aigas. I remember experiencing it for the first time during ranger training, which is a comprehensive 6 week training programme set up for us rangers on our arrival to this beautiful place in the wild Highlands. We are taken through absolutely everything there is to know, from geology and history, right through to the best places for wildlife spotting, and within those 6 weeks you start feeling like the Highlands has become your home. The west coast day is the longest day that we take guests on, but well worth the breath-taking views across the Minch (the water between the mainland and the Outer Hebrides), as
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Two days, five ospreys

7 September, 2017. Posted by Aigas Field Centre

Last week I was lucky enough to see two ospreys perching by the Aigas Loch. It was 6am and the loch was very peaceful, just myself and one of our guests. We were able to watch the ospreys gliding and perching for an hour. I was even able to take an extremely blurry photo. This was such a special experience as the ospreys will be leaving for their migration to Africa very soon. Their route will most likely take them south over England, France and Spain, then crossing over Gibraltar before they fly down the western coast of Africa where they will spend the winter. [caption id="attachment_1030" align="alignnone" width="360"] Two ospreys perched by the Aigas Loch. CREDIT: Alison Tait[/caption] I had fully expected this to be my
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